Gear Review: Salewa Wildfire Approach Shoes

 

Photo courtesy of Salewa

Photo courtesy of Salewa

One of the most important pieces of gear for long distance backpackers are their shoes. For my thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail, I chose the Salewa Wildfire Approach Shoes. I knew that if I planned on hiking anything more than fifteen miles a day with a 25+ lb backpack, foot love was top priority. I’ll be honest, what originally attracted me to these shoes was its style; the futuristic look and bright color scheme of the Wildfires caught my eye. In fact, my boyfriend/hiking partner, Lucas, saw me checking out the different colors online and said, “Wow. I want those.”

After a bit of research, we both ordered our first pairs. I figured the shoe’s design would function well on the trail’s terrain and, long story short, it does. Untitled2

DESIGN

Although the Wildfires are an approach shoe, their sticky rubber, stiff sole, and unique ankle design serve well for long distance backpacking through tough terrain. There are many sections of the A.T. where scrambling up and down rocks is necessary, and the Vibram Tech Approach EVO sole gripped those rocks with no problem. As a rock climber (and shorter person), I appreciated the rubber toe box a lot. Instead of being forced to lunge up a section of rocky steps, I could find little toe chips and pockets to use as intermediates.

The sticky rubber also allowed Lucas and I the chance to slip off our packs and climb up boulders we saw along the trail, which is something you can’t do in a pair of traditional trail runners! 10336792_470475323085364_6745281100402170421_n

PERFORMANCE

They perform well on steep or uneven terrain, rocky descents, snow, dirt, and just about anything else. However, we did experience some slippage on mud and slick rocks, but I believe that becomes unavoidable to some extent. We purchased the shoes without Gore-Tex, and they dried overnight when laid sideways, which is important for a rainy Appalachian Trail afternoon. Lucas went the entire time without getting any blisters, giving credibility to Salewa’s “100% blister-free” claims. I, however, did acquire a tiny blister on one of my toes (it went away overnight though).

Many people use high-top boots on their hikes for the ankle support. During research, we came across theories that claimed the high-top ankle support actually weakens your body’s natural ability to stabilize itself. Since we have gone as far as we have without twisting an ankle (knock on wood), I’d say the ankle support in the Wildfires was enough.

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FIT

For six months, Lucas wore his Wildfires as his everyday street shoe. He was obsessed with the fit from the moment he took them out of the box. During our thru-hike, the shoes felt right, as if everything was how it should be in a shoe and the toe box was wide enough. That is, until our feet swelled. I made the mistake of ordering only a half size up–big mistake! I encourage you to buy a full size up from your street shoe if you intend to hike over 100 miles within a short period. Feet swelling and collapsed arches are inevitable when long distance backpacking!

Thankfully, the Wildfires are laced similar to climbing shoes, and extend far towards the toe. Again, buy your shoe that extra size up and just tighten the laces for a secure fit. Both Lucas and I found the customizable insoles interesting, but I admit that I did not take advantage of this feature because I used my own super stiff, replacement insole (which I regret). The MFF+ Footbed system is definitely something to play around with and use to create the best fit for your foot. The wider insoles and extra cushion in the heel options will help with foot swelling. We ended up re-lacing our shoes 500 miles into the A.T. because our feet widened too much.

Note: this strange method does allow the shoe to widen, but it doesn’t take advantage of the Wildfire’s unique lacing. photo 3(1)

DURABILITY

It’s not uncommon to see torn up shoes on the A.T.–seriously. Many thru-hikers sport duct tape on their shoes, or have a couple of toes hanging out the front. So, although parts of our shoes began to fall apart, there wasn’t much functional damage. Nothing that would hinder our hiking ability changed; there was no real tread wear and the toe box maintained its edge. I’m absolutely impressed with their durability!

The shoes only became less aesthetically pleasing with time. The first thing to show wear was the EXA shell that covers the bottom sides of the shoe–pieces of the beehive-like plastic began to fall off about 200 miles into our thru-hike. Next, we noticed the back and the sides of our ankle support wearing down to expose the inner foam. Luckily these changes did not effect the feel of our shoes–in truth, my heels couldn’t tell the difference. The rubber never separated from the outer fabric, and there are no holes either. photo 4

CONCLUSION

These shoes are absolutely superb/I highly recommend them. Wear them during a section hike, take them on a climbing trip, or sport them around town–it doesn’t matter, you’ll fall for their magical powers. If you plan on using them for a thru-hike, UP-size and enjoy! The quality of the Wildfire’s design and durability is suited for more difficult, technical hiking. This shoe makes a huge difference when scrambling over rocks. No joke, fellow hikers were envious of our gripping capabilities and asked to try on Lucas’ pair.

In the end, I wore my shoes for a little over 600 miles, and since Lucas wore his for 6 months before the trail, we guess his accumulated mileage is near 1,000. If we would have sized properly, I’d say the shoes could have easily handled 1,500 miles. Soon, we will be sporting new pairs of Firetails, which are the next model up in stiffness. We plan on walking in them all the way to Katahdin!

Gear List

Note: Lucas and I have no idea how much we spent on gear. However, we purchased most of it at a discounted price. Here’s a few suggestions on how to find deals.

  • The Clymb, Steep & Cheap, and the REI-OUTLET are good places to check regularly. Also, look in the clearance section of your local outdoor stores, and even generic retail outlets.
  • Amazon! Just make sure to watch the prices (they change often). Amazon also refers you to deals offered by other sites like Sierra Trading Post, and if you click through the colors on various items, odd colors are almost always cheaper (hence why my clothes are so bright).
  • Don’t forget thrift-stores, especially if there are outdoor related ones in your area. Lucas bought a nice Columbia fleece from Goodwill for less than two dollars.

With that said, here’s our gear list!

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SLEEP SYSTEM                                                                      Lucas                  Montana

General Item Specifics
Tent Tarp Tent Squall 2 (6 stakes)
Sleeping Pad Therm-a-Rest Prolite & Therm-a-Rest Prolite Plus Short
Sleeping Bag The North Face Cat’s Meow & The North Face Cat’s Meow Women
Sleeping Bag Liner Coleman Stratus Fleece & Sea to Summit Reactor Thermolite Liner

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PACK
Backpack Osprey Atmos 50 & ULA Circuit
Space Blanket Mylar Emergency Blanket
Pack Liner Trash Compactor Bags
Stuff Sacks Sea to Summit eVac Bag x2 and Sea to Summit eVent Compression Dry Sack x2

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KITCHEN
Cook Pot Evernew Ultralight Titanium 1.3 L
Stove Homemade Alcohol Stove with 8 oz denatured alcohol as fuel, & aluminium windscreen
Spork Snowpeak Titanium x2
Plate Sea to Summit Collapsible Plate

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Water/First Aid
Water System/Purification 2L Platypus Bladder x2 & Platypus GravityWorks
Bear Bag and Rope Sea to Summit Ultra-Sil Dry Sack & orange 550 paracord
Pack Liner Trash Compactor Bags
Knee Braces Cho-Pat Dual Action x4
First Aid Kit Ibuprofen, Medical Tape, 6 Bandages, Gauze, Benzoin Tincture, 2 gloves, tweezers, nail clippers, antihistamine, safety pins, tiny floss, thread, needle, and Iodine Tablets.
 Bug Net  Sea to Summit Mosquito Head Net x2
Pot Scrapper GSI Outdoors Compact Scraper
Toiletries In Ziplock bag – Sunscreen, insect repellent, chapstick x2, toothbrushes, small toothpaste, Bronner’s soap in 2oz bottle,  Wet Ones, gold bond, petroleum jelly, and hair ties.
Mirror Coghlan’s Feather Light Camping Mirror Survival

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CLOTHES
Shoes Salawa Men’s & Women’s Wildfire, Superfeet Blue Premium Insoles, $10 croc-offs from Walmart, and Women’s Vibram Five Finger   
Pants Target Champion pants & Outdoor Research Women’s Voodoo Pant
T-shirts Target Champion shirts x2
Socks Injinji toe sock liners x4, SmartWool Lightweight Hiking Socks x4, and SmartWool Mountaineering Extra Heavy Socks x2 as camp socks
Longsleeve Minus33 Merino Wool Turtleneck & SmartWool Zip-up
Rain Gear The North Face Venture Rain Jacket Hyvent & Women’s Marmot Precip Rain Jacket
Jackets ExOfficio Storm Logic Jacket, Scott Synthetic Down Jacket, and Columbia Fleece jacket x 2
Misc. Fleece Gloves x2, Minus33 Merino Wool Cuff Beanie, Polyester Hat, Minus33 Merino Wool Midweight Balaclava, 3 Bandanas/buffs x2, and Brimmed Hats x2
BaseLayer Tights Minus33 Merino Wool Leggings & Columbia Women’s Baselayer Tights
Underwear Men’s ExOfficio Boxers x2, Women’s ExOfficio Boy Cut x2, and Polyester Bras from Target x2
Shorts Billabong Boardshorts & Columbia Cross On Over Cargo Shorts

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MISCELLANEOUS/ELECTRONICS
Headlamps x2
Knifes Morakniv Companion Knife & Razor Blade
Notebooks Moleskin Soft Notebook Large & Volant Large x4 pens
Electronics

PowerGen 6000mAh charger, Sansa Mp3 player, x2 headphones, water resistant watch, and cords

Phones/camera Iphone 5 & LifeProof Case/Motofone f3

Final Notes:

  • Montana’s backpack baseweight is about 16lbs and Lucas’ is 19lbs.
  • Our tent uses trekking poles to prop it up, and only weighs 2lbs. Best. Investment. Ever. Check-out TarpTent.
  • There are great quick-dry clothes at Target. We even bought a water-resistant watch on sale for $10, aka our alarm clock.
  • For the ladies with back pain or Scoliosis, Target also has quick-dry bras (not sports bras) that feel fantastic.
  • Columbia fleece jackets last forever. I’ve had a boy’s fleece for seven years. It has survived everyday use, numerous rock climbing & camping trips, summited a mountain, and more. No snags, no holes–it’s perfect.
  • Cho-Pat Dual Action Knee Braces are great for crummy knees. Seriously. Get these babies if you experience discomfort or pain. I’ll write a review soon.
  • We’ll mail our cold weather gear back home around Damascus, VA, so our pack weight will drop a few pounds.

And that’s just about it!

We start our thru-hike in less than a week. I hope we don’t have to send things back at Neels Gap! (;

Thru-hiker Trail Mix

3 weeks from now, Lucas and I will be camped somewhere along the trail! I look forward to the end of the planning process–I can’t wait until we stand atop Springer Mountain, prepared and ready for 5 months in the woods. It’s kind of stressful balancing calories per gram…and my checking account.

As of now, we plan on resupplying from 18-20 mail-drops (and buying the rest from grocery stores). There are plenty of outfitters, hostels, and post offices along the Appalachian Trail that will hold our packages until we make it to town. We have chosen to mail food to ourselves when resupply stores are inconvenient. Also, we want to eat clean food during our thru-hike, and buying ahead of time has allowed us to stock-up for cheap from Sam’s Club and Trader Joe’s (amazing deals for organic/natural options).

Below are pics of our current food endeavor: preparing homemade trail mix! 

  

There are three easy steps to making simple, semi-raw mixes.

Step 1: 

Buy nuts, dried fruits, and whatever looks delicious/high in calories. Chow Mein noodles are a surprisingly good touch to trail mix. And dark chocolate is always a good idea.

Step 2: 

Get a brown paper bag, pour the above into the bag, and then shake it. If you want, you can measure out each ingredient to the right amount, or just eyeball it like I did (I added nuts and what not until the mix looked like the stuff you’d see at a store).

Step 3: 

Measure out servings and then package it in ziplocks or vaccum seal bags.

Lucas will have approximately 3/4 to 1 cup of trail mix a day and I’ll have 1/2 to 3/4 cup. We’re not sure how many calories are in each serving, however, most of the ingredients are 5+ calories per gram…so that’s about 750-950 calories a cup. 

EASY PEASY and cheaper than buying premade mixes!

Appalachian Trail Food

Many thru-hikers use the AT as an excuse to gorge on anything light, tasty, and oh-so bad for your arteries. Lucas and I both know that we function optimally on clean, low-glycemic foods. Below is our list of healthy hiker grub.

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Breakfast: Even a life of get-up-and-go needs a little routine. We plan on boiling water for coffee and oatmeal in the morning, with granola or trail mix thrown in. Warm liquid to slurp and hot food seems like a good way to get our minds ready for another day of carrying 20+ pounds through the woods.

In case we wake up in a rainstorm and want to munch on the move, we will also eat

  • Bars (see list below)
  • Toaster pastries

Snacks: About half our daily calories will come from snacks.

  • Bear Valley Pemmican Bars
  • Skout Organic Trailbars
  • Nugo Organic Bars
  • Variety of other whole grain/high protein bars
  • Homemade trail mixes (a lot of our calorie intake relies on this!)
  • Homemade dried fruit: banana chips, apples, pineapple, mango
  • Almond and Peanut Butter
  • Cookies
  • Dark chocolate
  • Beef Jerky
  • Tortilla and Pita chips

Lunch: Around midday we will take a longer, hour-long rest. We’ll eat our lunch along with the snacks mentioned above.

  • Almond/peanut butter with tortillas
  • Bagels w/ Nutella
  • Dehydrated hummus with crackers
  • Dried cheese with crackers or tortillas
  • Tuna in foil packets

Dinner: We plan on eating a warm, stick-to-your-ribs dinner each night. If it is raining, we might settle on “lunch” foods. For extra calories, we’ll add sporkfuls of coconut oil or olive oil.

  • Instant soups (miso, black bean, chicken, or lentil)
  • whole wheat angel hair pasta, Parmesan cheese, and jerky
  • Mac and Cheese with tuna or jerky
  • Instant mashed potatoes
  • Stove Top Stuffing
  • Quinoa and dehydrated beans

Drinks:

  • Hot chocolate
  • Tea
  • Ground coffee (cowboy style)
  • Apple Cider
  • Gatorade
  • Emergen-C

For more information on how we picked specific foods, check out Backpacking Nutrition.

Backpacking Nutrition

On average, Appalachian Trail thru-hikers burn about 4,000-6,000 calories a day. Our goal is to eat the amount of calories required, as well as pick the most nutritious, calorie-dense, delicious, and affordable options. We’ve also decided to schedule mail-drops rather than purchase our food from local grocery stores, mainly because it is cheaper to buy in bulk/ahead of time (in small towns off the trail, a pack of Ramen can be $1 a pack!). I admit, it has been slightly overwhelming to plan our food for the next five months–who knows how long it will take for us to tire of trail mix–but I believe that variety is key to a happy hiker stomach.

After reading the NOLS Cookery book and various websites, I have determined that I will require approximately 4,000 calories a day, while Lucas needs about 6,000. I have also concluded that a diet consisting of 50% carbohydrates, 35% fat, and 15% protein is ideal for our daily hiking mileage and trip duration. Fat is the most calorie-dense food, so a diet high in fat allows us to reduce our pack weight while maintaining our high calorie count. It is important for us to be aware of our consumption of non-nutritious foods while thru-hiking. Although Poptarts provide a high amount of carbohydrates and fats, they do not contain sufficient nutrients and minerals needed to function optimally (not to mention, they’re highly processed). Therefore, we will take a multivitamin, carry Emergen-C packets, and try to eat as healthy as possible.

Here’s the equation I used to determine how much food I will carry per day:

(4000 calories/person/day) ÷ (120 calories/oz) ÷ (16 oz/lb) = 2.08 lbs/person/day

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organic bars, 4 cal per g, and just 41 cents a bar!

Using the NOLS Cookery book, here’s our daily food allowance in percentages:

  • Breakfast = 15%
  •  Lunch and Snacks = 50%
  •  Drink mixes = 5%
  •  Dinner = 25%
  •  Desserts = 5%

I used these meal percentages to determine how many grams we can carry of each (Yes, GRAMS. Lucas bought a scale… the scientist in him wants us to be as accurate as possible). For example,

(2lbs of food/person/day) x (0.15 breakfast food) =0.3 lbs (136.2g) of breakfast food/person/day

Using this formula, I have determined that I will eat 1lbs (454g) of food for lunch and snacks, 0.1lbs (45.4g) of drink mixes, 0.5lbs (227g) for dinner, and 0.1lbs (45.4g) of desert every day.

Phew! Now that the math part is out of the way, next time I’ll discuss the actual food we will carry.

How to Make a Camp Stove for Under $5

Instead of dropping 50+ dollars on a camp stove, Lucas and I decided to make our own from two aluminum cans. We will use denatured alcohol for fuel during our Appalachian Trail thru-hike. Alcohol burning stoves are cheap, ultralight weight, and just as reliable as a store-bought stove. Our stove will be used primarily for boiling water to rehydrate dehydrated food. From our tests, we have concluded that it takes less than five minutes to boil 500 mL of lukewarm water.

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to create your own!

Materials you will need:

  • two aluminum cans 
  • books for a steady line
  • permanent marker
  • small nail, thumb tack, or push pin
  • sandpaper
  • razor blades
  • scissors
  • stapler
  • pliers

materials

Step 1:

Use a book (or something sturdy) for a constant height to score the can with a razor blade. Once you have scored the bottom, you puncture the can along the score line and then press along the edge of the line until the bottom separates. If the can does not tear apart easily, use the sharp edge of the razor to CAREFULLY cut along the score line. This will dull the blade greatly, so make sure you have backup razors if you choose this method (I used one blade for each can).

Do this with both cans, use whatever height you feel necessary, but keep in mind that the final stove will be a little taller than your cut lines.

step 1

step 2

Step 2:

When the cuts are done, sand the sharp edges for safety (newly cut aluminum is VERY sharp). If you want your stove to have none of the can’s labels, sand the sides of the two cans.

step 3

Step 3:

Choose one can to be the top of the stove, and set the bottom portion aside. Score the top portion of the stove along the concave part of the can. This sounds difficult, but if you score at an almost horizontal angle, it makes the cut a lot easier than you would expect. Now use the point of the scissors to press the score line until the top pops out.

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Step 4:

Take the remnants of one of the cut cans, and cut a wide strip of the aluminum off. This will be the inner lining of the stove.

step 4

Step 5:

Measure and trim the strip of aluminum so it will fit into the grooves of both the top and bottom portion of the stove, and staple the strip into a ring. After the ring is measured and stapled, cut small “windows” on the bottom of the ring so the fuel will be able to move throughout the stove once it is completed.

step 5

Step 6:

Take your pliers and make slight twists on the edge of one portion of the stove so that it will fit into the other portion.

step 6

Step 7:

Here comes the hard part–try to fit the ring made earlier into the grooves on both portions of the stove while slowly pushing one section into the other.  You may need to use your pliers to bend little bits out of the way so the ring will fit right. If done correctly, the lip of the top portion of the stove will cover the edge of the ring.

step 7

Step 8:

Use a small nail (or push pin, thumb tack, etc.) to puncture holes into the top portion of the stove. You can use a piece of tape to measure the circumference of the stove and make tick marks at constant intervals along the tape to have holes that are equal distances apart from one another. I didn’t do this, just eyeballed the holes and punched away.

step 8

And that’s our final product!

Now pour about a half-inch of denatured alcohol, light the fuel with a lighter or match, and there ya go… a fully functional stove.

step 9

Tips:

Use a pot-stand to make sure you don’t snuff the flame with your pot. We made our original one out of an aluminum grill screen, but it started to melt (whoops). Our next pot stand will be made out of good ole chicken wire.

How to train for hikes in Florida

Yesterday Lucas and I discovered the perfect tool for our training–the massive football stadium about a mile away! Around 9pm we got the idea to pack our backpacks with approximately 15-20 lbs of weight and make our way to the stadium. We walked up and down a series of steep ramps for 2 hours at 5 set intervals.

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The inclines were awesome for our calves!  Though, to everyone running up and down the steps in spandex,  we looked like confused homeless people.

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With our bandannas drenched and shoulders sore, we flung our packs onto the floor of our home around midnight. We’re probably going to go back tomorrow night to get in one more intense walk before I leave for Washington (this Saturday! Can’t wait!!).

Planning the Planning Process

Yesterday I checked out a book from my university’s library, The Appalachian Trail: Celebrating America’s Hiking Trail. I admit, it was quite the adventure finding the books among endless shelves of dust and hardbound covers on the library floor I never explore. There’s a good deal on the Trail’s history in books circa the 1950s, but from reading things like ‘wool breeches’ and ‘tennis slippers’ I have decided to browse through them later out of curiosity and not now, while I’m in search of basic (up-to-date) information.

Anyway, three other A.T. books ordered through Amazon:

AWOL on the Appalachian Trail and The A.T. Guide 2013 by David Miller

A Walk in the Woods: Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail by Billy Bryson

I have officially entered the obsession stage in my A.T. planning. This past week I’ve focused  on the blog, made lists of what I need to purchase and planned what I need to plan. At the end of July I am going on a ten day expedition in Washington. Luckily the program provided an outline of everything I need to do in order to train/pack. I figure a lot of the gear and prep work for the AT and that overlap so… here are my current training plans:

  • Go on longish (4-8 hour) hikes in hilly terrain with a 20+ pound pack.
  • (since I live in flatland Florida) Simulate hiking up steep terrain via hills, long flights of stairs, or stadium stairs for 1-1.5 hours with my pack. Making sure I climb AND descend.
  • Incorporate more cardio into my daily routine by bike rides, short hikes, or the elliptical.
  • 2-4 days of gym climbing a week with one of these days focusing on strength exercises with an emphasis on legs.

Gotta’ have beast legs to climb this beaut!

Mt. Baker via Wikipedia

And so it begins

Today I woke up inspired and ready to begin the planning process for my Appalachian Trail 2014 thru-hike. I am currently a senior in my university’s Creative Writing program and will begin my Northbound adventure next March.

I think it started with National Geographic documentaries and PBS specials back in 2010. Right away, I was inspired to explore the East portion of my country and become acquainted with terrain I had always overlooked. My boyfriend Lucas and I have set this goal together–the trail has been of interest to him for the past five years.  Summer/fall 2012 he backpacked through Israel, Spain, Portugal, Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Greece, etc. for approximately four months. When he returned to his hometown after numerous nights of sleeping in a hammock, and our communication picked up, I told him about my vague plans of the hike. Long story short, AT partners turned into a relationship and here we are, at the beginning stages of preparation!

Rock climbing 3-4 years in a family-sized Florida community brought upon a growing passion in both of us;  to reconnect with nature and enjoy the mountains, the woods, boulders, trails, and lakes for what they are and in their natural form. I am energized by every exposure to the outdoors. As a Boy Scout (I used to be a part of the coed program called Venture Crew) I am also concerned with the preservation of the land and live by the principle Leave No Trace Behind. My goal is to become integrated into a natural environment opposed to inhabiting the land. I also want to help others experience this sense of connectedness as well.

I cannot promise you any deep insight into the meaning of life, or what we can do to change the world, but I can share with you my passion for nature and document our journey along the way.

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